Can you solve a 10 year old’s math homework? As Rishi Sunak announces the subject should be compulsory till 18, TV presenter shares his child’s homework online – and it leaves the internet stunned

Can you solve a 10 year old’s math homework?

It’s the question that has the internet puzzling as a parent admitted to leaving Twitter users scratching their heads after sharing her child’s surprisingly difficult feat online.

So as Prime Minister Rishi Sunak announces that maths should be compulsory until the age of 18 as he sets out his vision for Britain, we ask you… can you answer this?

Hasim counted his money at the beginning of the day. He gave 1/3rd of his money to his brother. He spent £12 on a gift for his sister. Then he counted what he had left, and what he had at the beginning of the day was half of that. How much money did he give to his brother? show your way

What is the question?

Hasim counted his money at the beginning of the day. He gave 1/3rd of his money to his brother. He spent £12 on a gift for his sister. Then he counted what he had left, and what he had at the beginning of the day was half of that. How much money did he give to his brother? show me your way

What is the Internet saying?

66187909 11598539 image a 98 1672838378538

66187905 11598539 image m 103 1672838519203

66187911 11598539 image m 102 1672838512959

what’s the answer?

If Hasim gives 1/3 of his money to his brother, spends £12, and is left with half the money, then:

Then solve x:

So how much did Hasim give to his brother?

The numeracy mayhem comes as Rishi Sunak's 'big idea' of making maths compulsory till the age of 18 was today mocked as a 'dead cat'.  Image: The Prime Minister outside Downing Street

It comes as Mr Sunak’s ‘big idea’ of making maths compulsory for 18-year-olds was today mocked as a ‘dead cat’ to distract from the NHS crisis and a winter of discontent.

It comes as Mr Sunak’s ‘big idea’ of making maths compulsory for 18-year-olds was today mocked as a ‘dead cat’ to distract from the NHS crisis and a winter of discontent.

In his first major speech as prime minister this afternoon, Mr Sunak promised to prepare children for the ‘jobs of the future’ by combating the high rate of attrition in the UK.

Young people will be forced to take ‘some form’ of maths, either through new courses or existing qualifications such as A-levels, T-levels and core maths. Most drives are likely to involve practical skills rather than algebra.

But opposition parties dismissed the initiative as ’empty’ – while the Tories urged Sunak to focus on tackling illegal immigration instead.

Nigel Farage swipes that the ‘quadratic equation’ won’t help fix ‘broken Britain’.

According to government figures, around eight million adults in England have the numeracy skills expected of primary school children.

Currently, only about half of 16- to 19-year-olds study maths in some form. The problem is particularly acute for disadvantaged students, 60 percent of whom do not have basic math skills by age 16.

Former cabinet minister John Redwood urged Mr Sunak to focus on tackling illegal immigration and the Channel crisis

Former cabinet minister John Redwood urged Mr Sunak to focus on tackling illegal immigration and the Channel crisis

Nigel Farage swipes that 'quadratic equation' won't help fix 'broken Britain'

Nigel Farage swipes that ‘quadratic equation’ won’t help fix ‘broken Britain’

Shadow Education Secretary Bridget Philipson said the prime minister ‘needs to show his work’, as ‘he cannot deliver on this warm, empty pledge without more maths teachers’.

He added: ‘Yet the government has missed its target for new maths teachers year-on-year, because existing teachers are leaving in high numbers.’

A Labor source said: ‘In his desperation to ensure Sunak’s speech after Keir’s speech, No 10 has revealed he has nothing to offer the country… except double counting.

‘After 12 years of Tory rule with healthcare in tatters, criminals terrorizing the streets, and working people worrying how their wages will last the month, the country is entitled to ask: is this it?’

Former cabinet minister John Redwood tweeted: ‘As the Prime Minister turns his attention to teaching maths, he must not forget his choice as stopping illegal immigration was the foremost priority.

‘Parliament urgently needs to legislate on small boats and public services.’

Mr Faraj also joined in, saying: ‘So Rishi Sunak’s big idea to save the nation is maths by the age of 18! How will quadratic equations help to solve broken Britain?’

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