A Minnesota assistant professor was fired after showing students in her class a painting of the Prophet Muhammad.

Erika López Prater, 42, was fired from her position at Hamline University in St. Paul despite warning students ahead of time about the 14th-century imagery.

a new report from new York Times Indicates that the professor was fired by Hamline University President Phineas Miller for placing academic freedom on the honor of Muslim students.

Many practicing Muslims do not believe in looking at pictures of the Prophet Muhammad because they believe this may lead to worship of an image.

Despite warnings given by the assistant professor, Aram Vedtalla, a Muslim senior in the class, said she was blinded by the image. ‘I’m like, ‘This can’t be real,'” Vedatala said in an interview with the school’s newspaper.

In a letter sent to students, Hamline University President Phineas Miller apologized for the incident and said it was incredibly important not to offend the school's Muslim students.

In a letter sent to students, Hamline University President Phineas Miller apologized for the incident and said it was incredibly important not to offend the school’s Muslim students.

In a letter sent to students, Miller apologized for the incident and said it was incredibly important not to offend the school’s Muslim students.

‘It is not our intention to blame; Rather, we intend to note that in the classroom incident – ​​where an image of Muslims was projected on a screen and left on for several minutes – respect for the observant Muslim students in that classroom was undermined by academic freedom. Should have been up,’ Miller said.

The New York Times reports that the syllabus issued by the lecturer informed students that they would see holy figures from all religions, including the Prophet Muhammad and Buddha.

Additionally, López Prater reportedly alerted the students moments before they were shown the painting, giving them another chance to leave the room if they did not feel comfortable viewing the painting.

Again, no students brought up any concerns or walked out of class during the October lecture.

Despite the warnings, Aram Vedtalla, a Muslim senior in the class, said she was blinded by the image.

‘I’m like, ‘This can’t be real,’ said Vedatalla in an Iinterview with the school newspaper,

‘As a Muslim and a black man, I don’t feel like I belong, and I don’t feel like I’ve ever belonged to a community where they don’t value me as a member, and they don’t show that is the same respect I show them,’ said the student.

Vedatalla, a member of the Muslim Students Union, then enlisted the support of Muslim students who were not in the class, but called the incident an attack on their religion.

A Minnesota assistant professor who showed students a painting of the Prophet Muhammad lost her job after the incident

A Minnesota assistant professor who showed students a painting of the Prophet Muhammad lost her job after the incident

In a letter sent to students, Miller apologized for the incident and said it was incredibly important not to offend the school's Muslim students.

In a letter sent to students, Miller apologized for the incident and said it was incredibly important not to offend the school’s Muslim students.

According to AboutIslam.net, the practice of avoiding images goes back centuries and stems from a fear of images sending the wrong message.

According to AboutIslam.net, the practice of avoiding images goes back centuries and stems from a fear of images sending the wrong message.

After class was over, Vedatalla stuck around to talk Lopez Prater.

The conversation prompted the professor to send an email to her department head, Allison Baker, informing her of the situation.

Baker, chair of the digital and studio art department, responded by saying: ‘It looked like you did everything right.’

Baker wrote, ‘I believe in academic freedom so you have my support.’

The group demanded action from officials and the movement did not welcome back first assistant López Prater for the spring semester.

Diangela Huddleston, a senior at Hamline and member of the Muslim Student Union, said of the incident: ‘Hamline teaches us that the intent doesn’t matter, the effect matters.’

A Hamline spokeswoman said Lopez-Prate “received an appointment letter for the fall semester, and will teach courses until the end of the term.”

DailyMail.com contacted Hamline University officials for a statement on the professor’s dismissal, but did not receive a response by the time of publication.

Vedatalla is a member of the Muslim Students' Union and has gained the support of Muslim students who were not in the class but called the incident an attack on their religion

Vedatalla is a member of the Muslim Students’ Union and has gained the support of Muslim students who were not in the class but called the incident an attack on their religion

'As a Muslim and a black man, I don't feel like I belong, and I don't feel like I've ever belonged to a community where they don't value me as a member, and they don't show that same respect that I show them,' said Vedtala

‘As a Muslim and a black man, I don’t feel like I belong, and I don’t feel like I’ve ever belonged to a community where they don’t value me as a member, and they don’t show that same respect that I show them,’ said Vedtala

The university president also said in his letter that academic freedom is 'very important' but it 'should not come at the cost of caring for others and decency'

The university president also said in his letter that academic freedom is ‘very important’ but it ‘should not come at the cost of caring for others and decency’

At a town hall after the event, an invited Muslim speaker compared showing the images to teaching 'Hitler was good', according to the New York Times.

At a town hall after the event, according to the New York Times, an invited Muslim speaker compared showing the images to teaching ‘Hitler was good’.

According to the New York Times, at a town hall following the event, an invited Muslim speaker ‘compared the pictures to teaching that Hitler was good’.

The university president has also said in his letter that while academic freedom is ‘very important’, it should be there.It doesn’t have to come at the expense of caring and decency for others.

in a statement to an outlet Last week, a school representative said that they wouldFeel safe, supported and respected both inside and outside your classrooms.’

The firing also drew backlash from those who believed the firing was an attack on academic freedom.

An Islamic art historian wrote an essay defending Dr. López Prater and started a petition that received thousands of signatures demanding an investigation of the incident by the university’s board.

Another organization, PEN America, called her firing: ‘one of the most egregious violations of academic freedom in recent memory.’

According to about islam dot netThe practice of avoiding images goes back centuries and stems from a fear of images sending the wrong message.

The website states, ‘Islam has always prohibited drawing pictures of God and his prophets.’

The site continues, ‘Initially, this prohibition was simply to avoid the temptation to worship images, as people have been doing for centuries.’

‘As far as depicting the Prophet is concerned, Muslims do not make pictures or idols of the Prophet Muhammad for obvious reasons. This is not because pictures or art are evil or wicked, but because images can lead to a wrong understanding.’

The author of the post, Idris Tawfiq, has said that portraying the Prophet Muhammad may make him look like a holy figure, when he was just a man.

‘Prophet Muhammad was a man. He was not a saint or a deity, but an ordinary person. The affection in which he is held by the Muslims is intense. Taufiq writes, making statues and pictures of that man can make people see something more in the man that he was.

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