A woolly mammoth expert revealed the location where 500,000 teeth were allegedly dumped, following a bone rush in New York City’s East River.

Speaking on the Joe Rogan podcast, gold miner John Reeves said he wants to start a ‘bone rush’ and has mapped the location of 50 tonnes of mammoth teeth that could be at the bottom of the East River.

Reeves read from a draft report from the Fairbanks Mining District, Alaska, detailing the 1940 transport of 500,000 teeth from Fairbanks to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Reeves – who owns thousands of mining acres in the area and received the report from the company that bought it, and spoke to its lead author, Richard Osborne of the University of Alaska – said the museum ‘ran out of storage’ and dumped the bones. .

The report revealed the location of the dumping site at East River Drive and 65th Street.

Woolly mammoth tusks can each go for around $20,000 depending on their condition, making the potential value on the river bed around $1 billion.

Reeves said, ‘If any of you want to go out and find some bones, I’ll tell you where they are.’ ‘Those explorers are the keepers.’

Some bonkers, a term used for people searching for valuable bones, have already picked up the call, sharing videos of their trips to the East River.

Alaska gold miner John Reeves, mammoth expert, reveals the location of 500,000 tusk bones allegedly dumped in the middle of New York City’s East River

Citing the draft report, Reeves said that gold miners shipped 500,000 tusks to New York because the owners saw ‘no value’.

Reeves told Rogan, ‘You’ll remember this was between 1928 and 1958. ‘People, you know the miners, did not collect the bones.’

According to reports about the teeth, ‘mistakes’ were made regarding the ‘acceptable condition’ of the bones sent to New York.

“They stuffed a whole boxcar of these bones, they got out of storage, and they dumped them in the East River,” Reeves said.

These teeth were eventually dumped in the river at the former dumping site of a New York City hospital.

Reeves said the teeth were 'accidentally' dumped along East River Drive near 65th Street

Reeves said the teeth were ‘accidentally’ dumped along East River Drive near 65th Street

The revelation has kicked off a bone rush, with fortune-seekers already on the river looking for the tusk, which could fetch $20,000 a piece

The revelation has kicked off a bone rush, with fortune-seekers already on the river looking for the tusk, which could fetch $20,000 a piece

people looking up and down the east river

net worth could be $1 billion

In total, the teeth thrown out in 1940 are estimated to be worth up to $1 billion.

Although Reeves said that the exact method and location of the dump was unknown, he noted that the mammoth teeth were dense and would not float away, suggesting that they may still be on the river bed somewhere.

Reeves thought: ‘If I was listening to your podcast, and I have a boat, and I have a little bit of scuba equipment?’

Rogan was also enamored of the prospect of a successful Bone Rush proposed by Reeves.

Rogan said, ‘Do you know how crazy it would be if there were f****** mammoth bones in the East River.’

Reeves replied, ‘Friend, let me tell you something about the mammoth bones, they are very valuable.’

Alaskan miners reportedly sent them to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, who saw no value in the teeth.  Image: Ivory found on an Alaskan expedition in 1907

Alaskan miners reportedly sent them to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, who saw no value in the teeth. Image: Ivory found on an Alaskan expedition in 1907

Reeves (right) said he wanted to start the Bone Rush.  Gold miner finds thousands of preserved bones on his land

Reeves (right) said he wanted to start the Bone Rush. Gold miner finds thousands of preserved bones on his land

Reeves, a self-made millionaire, knows something about the value of teeth after discovering perfectly preserved mammoth bones while he was mining for gold in Alaska.

Reeves, owner of Fairbanks Gold, LLC, owns thousands of acres of mining grounds along rivers in the state.

in one interview With academic researchers, Reeves describes himself as a champion swimmer who went to college in Florida before deciding to join them in Alaska in search of gold.

In the 1980s, Reeves purchased a gold dredging site outside Fairbanks, which was converted into a tourist site where visitors could search for gold along the river. The site has since been sold to Holland America.

Reeves expanded his holdings in the mining areas in Fairbanks as well as purchased state and federal land.

In a 2012 National Geographic documentary following Ice Age fossil collectors in Alaska, Reeves claimed to have found thousands of specimens on his land.

While his fellow miners quipped that searching for gold is more lucrative, Reeves said he became a passionate collector of ancient bones.

He had said, ‘Mammoth teeth are more fun to look at.’ ‘I like them more than a stack of 100 dollar bills.’

Since finding mammoth bones decades ago, Reeves has created a collection called Boneyard Alaska that houses his rare specimens

Since finding mammoth bones decades ago, Reeves has created a collection called Boneyard Alaska that houses his rare specimens

Image: Woolly Mammoth Tusk Found on Reeves' Land

Image: Woolly Mammoth Tusk Found on Reeves’ Land

,Boneyard AlaskaThe documentary, made following the discovery of Reeves’ bone earlier this year, echoes his passion for discovering ancient bones.

‘I was always fascinated by finding something in the land or the earth that told me a little bit about our culture and where we came from and what was here,’ Reeves said in the film. ‘The good things we get need to be saved.’

In the documentary, Reeves’ dig can be seen unearthing 100 bones in a single day, with researchers saying Reeves could recreate an entire herd of animals with his collection.

Reeves’ collection is particularly impressive because the permafrost in Alaska preserves the specimens so perfectly.

Image: Nearly 100 bones found in a single day on Reeves' land

Image: Nearly 100 bones found in a single day on Reeves’ land

The researchers noted that the amount of Reeves' collection could be used to reconstruct entire herds of ancient animals.

The researchers noted that the amount of Reeves’ collection could be used to reconstruct entire herds of ancient animals.

The collection at the Reeves Estate is particularly impressive because the permafrost in Alaska preserves the specimens perfectly.

The collection at the Reeves Estate is particularly impressive because the permafrost in Alaska preserves the specimens perfectly.

#Mammoth #expert #reveals #location #tusks #worth #millions #dollars #dumped #East #River

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *