Prince Harry said his military career ‘saved’ him following the tragic death of his mother, Princess Diana, by helping him ‘turn his pain into purpose’ – after he revealed he killed 25 Taliban fighters.

The Duke of Sussex, 38, served in the army for a total of 10 years, rising to the rank of captain and serving two tours of Afghanistan.

During the second tour, he spent four months from September 2012 to January 2013 as an Apache helicopter pilot.

Now, during her explosive tell-all interview on 60 Minutes, which premiered Sunday, the former royal called the situation her “calling” and said it “healed” her after the “trauma” she experienced at her mother’s death. had experienced a sudden loss – giving him a ‘greater purpose’.

Prince Harry said his military career “saved” him after the tragic death of his mother, Princess Diana, helping him “turn his pain into purpose” in a new interview with 60 Minutes.

The Duke of Sussex, 38, served in the military for a total of 10 years, rising to the rank of captain and serving two tours of Afghanistan.  he is seen in 2008

The Duke of Sussex, 38, served in the military for a total of 10 years, rising to the rank of captain and serving two tours of Afghanistan. he is seen in 2008

During the second tour, he spent four months from September 2012 to January 2013 as an Apache helicopter pilot.  as seen in January 2013

During the second tour, he spent four months from September 2012 to January 2013 as an Apache helicopter pilot. as seen in January 2013

Now, during her explosive tell-all interview with 60 Minutes, the former royal called the situation her

Now, during her explosive tell-all interview with 60 Minutes, the former royal called the situation her “calling” and said it “healed” her after the “shock” she experienced over her mother’s sudden death. He and Diana are seen in 1987

“My military career saved me in many respects,” he told host Anderson Cooper. ‘It put me out of the UK press headlines.

‘I was able to focus on a purpose greater than myself – wearing the same uniform as everyone else, feeling normal for the first time in my life, and completing some of the biggest challenges I’ve ever had.’

Harry explained that he ‘didn’t get passed to be a prince’ and that he had to work as hard as everyone else.

He joked, ‘There’s no prince autopilot button you can press and just the smell – takes you away.’

The 38-year-old said he was a ‘really good candidate for the army’ as he was a ‘young man in his 20s’ who was ‘suffering from shock’.

He continued: ‘But then I was shooting in the front seat of an Apache, flying it, monitoring four radios at once, and radio screaming to rescue and help anyone on the ground. Was there for, “We need support, we need air support.” That was my call. I felt healing in that strange way.’

While Harry joined the army in 2004, he said the war really began for him years earlier – when his mother tragically passed away in a car accident in 1997.

Harry (seen in 2008) explained he 'didn't get a pass at being a prince' and had to work as hard as everyone else

Harry (seen in 2008) explained he ‘didn’t get a pass at being a prince’ and had to work as hard as everyone else

The 38-year-old said he was a 'really good candidate for the army' because he was a 'young man in his 20s' who was 'suffering from shock'

The 38-year-old said he was a 'really good candidate for the army' because he was a 'young man in his 20s' who was 'suffering from shock'

The 38-year-old said he was a ‘really good candidate for the army’ because he was a ‘young man in his 20s’ who was ‘suffering from shock’

He said that from the moment he died, he began to ‘live his life on adrenaline’, and that he spent years ‘fighting himself’ as well as ‘the British press’.

He said, ‘I had great disappointment and blame towards the British press for their role in this.’

‘It was clear to us as children – the British press’ that we shared in our mother’s grief and there was a great deal of anger in me which, fortunately, I never expressed to anyone.’

Harry’s confession comes days after he revealed he killed 25 people during his second tour.

He talks about it in his memoir, Spare, which was released in Spain last week and will premiere worldwide on January 10.

In the book, he wrote that ‘you can’t kill them if you see them as people’ and that he saw them as ‘chess pieces removed from the board’ or ‘eliminated bad guys’. saw.

The prince was first deployed as a forward air controller in Helmand province in 2007 after three years of training, but his first tour of duty was cut short when an Australian magazine accidentally broke a media embargo.

However, he returned in 2012 to publicize his second deployment with the Ministry of Defense on the understanding that the media would allow him to be hired.

After learning to fly an Apache helicopter, Harry was deployed to Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan in 2012, where he stayed for 20 weeks.

During his 2012 tour, Harry helped provide helicopter support to the International Security Assistance Force and Afghan forces operating throughout Helmand Province.

While Harry (seen with Princess Anne in 2008) joined the army in 2004, he said the war really began for him years earlier - when his mother tragically passed away in 1997

While Harry (seen with Princess Anne in 2008) joined the army in 2004, he said the war really began for him years earlier – when his mother tragically passed away in 1997

He said that from the moment he died, he began to 'live his life on adrenaline', and that he spent years 'fighting himself' as well as 'the British press'.  He has been seen in Afghanistan in 2008

He said that from the moment he died, he began to ‘live his life on adrenaline’, and that he spent years ‘fighting himself’ as well as ‘the British press’. He has been seen in Afghanistan in 2008

Harry's admission comes just days after he reveals he killed 25 people during his second tour in his memoir, Spare.  He is pictured above during his time in the military

Harry's admission comes just days after he reveals he killed 25 people during his second tour in his memoir, Spare.  He is pictured above during his time in the military

Harry’s admission comes just days after he reveals he killed 25 people during his second tour in his memoir, Spare. He is pictured above during his time in the military

In the book, he wrote that 'if you see them as people you can't kill them' and that he saw them as 'chess pieces removed from the board' or 'eliminated bad guys'.

In the book, he wrote that ‘if you see them as people you can’t kill them’ and that he saw them as ‘chess pieces removed from the board’ or ‘eliminated bad guys’.

His comments were condemned as a 'terrible mistake' by the grieving father of one of his Afghanistan comrades, who killed himself after returning home.  Harry is seen in 2009

His comments were condemned as a ‘terrible mistake’ by the grieving father of one of his Afghanistan comrades, who killed himself after returning home. Harry is seen in 2009

Based at Camp Bastion, 662 Squadron Army Air Corps, to which he belonged, flew more than a hundred well-aimed missions for over 2,500 flight hours, conducting surveillance, interdiction and, when necessary, close combat attack Capabilities as well as provided escort duties for other aircraft. ,

Former Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Lord West told Sunday Mirror Later that there could be a threat of terrorist attacks on the Invictus Games after his entrance.

‘The Invictus Games label is very high on them and so I would have thought the threat level there would definitely be higher,’ the admiral said.

“What he has said will have serious security issues,” he said. The Taliban must be reading this thinking that this prince is summoning all of us chess pieces and is more than happy to kill us.

‘And I’m sure there will be a lot of people in the Islamic State and other terrorist organizations who will think this is something that should be avenged.’

The Duke of Sussex is the founder of the Invictus Games, an international sporting event for wounded military veterans that was launched in 2014.

His comments were also condemned as a ‘terrible mistake’ by the grieving father of one of his Afghanistan comrades, who killed himself after returning home.

Derek Hunt, whose son Nathan served as a bomb-disposal specialist with Harry’s unit in 2008, said: ‘Many soldiers and veterans will find the comments about his killing very disturbing – and probably [they] It may even inspire some people to have flashbacks of their time in the war.’

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