Sharp rise in university dropouts due to inflated Covid A-level grades: Fears ‘teacher assessment’ exam won’t prepare students for further education

  • Students returning to University of South Wales dropped out for 2022-2023
  • Grade inflation was cited as a reason after the pandemic teacher assessed exams
  • Almost half of all A-level grades – 45 per cent – ​​were awarded an A or A* in 2021

It has warned that the number of students leaving university has risen sharply due to teacher-assessed exams and the pandemic exaggerating A-level grades.

A university reported that students failed assessments or did not submit them at all There has been an alarming decrease in those returning to university this year.

Dr Ben Calvert, Vice Chancellor of the University of South Wales said this wire That the number of returning students for the 2022-2023 academic year has declined by 6.1 percent.

Almost half of all A-level grades – 45 per cent – ​​were awarded an A or A* in 2021, compared with 39 per cent in 2020 and 25 per cent in 2019

University staff were alerted to the issue in an email which reportedly read: ‘We are aware that the suspension of A-level examinations and so-called grade inflation has had an impact on A-levels and other qualifications; We also know that there is a trend in our local colleges to submit only a few assessments.

Grade inflation came after exams were canceled due to the pandemic, meaning teachers fixed grades for two years.

Coursework, class performance, and mini-assessments were used as measures to reach these grade decisions, giving students many opportunities to prove themselves.

Nearly half of all A-Level grades – 45 per cent – ​​were awarded an A or A* in 2021, compared with 39 per cent in 2020 and 25 per cent in 2019.

The University of South Wales has seen a 6.1 per cent drop in the number of returning students for the 2022-2023 academic year.

The University of South Wales has seen a 6.1 per cent drop in the number of returning students for the 2022-2023 academic year.

Last year saw 43,000 young people without a guaranteed place at university - the highest number in a decade - partly influenced by a spike in applications

Last year saw 43,000 young people without a guaranteed place at university – the highest number in a decade – partly influenced by a spike in applications

and had the highest A*S of 19.1 percent, up from 14.3 percent in 2020 and 7.8 percent in 2019.

While promises were made that examinations would become normal, the need for certain allowances was stressed so that The students were not deprived as compared to the previous year.

But 2022 sees 43,000 without a guaranteed place at university – the highest number in a decade – partly influenced by a spike in applications.

Conservative MP Robert Halfon and chairman of the Commons education committee raised his concerns about the exam system in 2021 on BBC Radio 4’s World at One programme.

He told them: ‘I worry about the fact that we think we have created a hard rock cake of grade inflation in our exam results and what we need to do to make sure our exams are a level playing field. Provides ground. , but of course… are recognized and valued by colleges, universities, and employers.

‘I would have preferred a system that had some sort of standardized assessment.’

EDSK Director Tom Richmond [education and skills] The think tank had also earlier warned that the high proportion of top grades could ‘undermine the credibility’ of the results.

With regard to awarding generous grades, he said: ‘Even though awarding such high grades may seem fair to some students, it may harm their long-term prospects when they apply for jobs in the future. ‘ ‘There is now a serious risk that this year’s grades are meaningless in the eyes of employers and universities.’

However, in 2022, top A-level grades recorded the biggest drop ever in the qualification’s 70-year history.

This was despite the supply of ‘cheat sheets’ and extra leniency due to Covid disruptions.

A-level result day in 2023 will be on 17 August.

exam result in 2021

44.8% of subject entries were awarded either an A or A*, up from 38.5 per cent in 2020 and 25.2 per cent in 2019.

19.1% of entries received an A*, up from 14.3 percent in 2020 and 7.8 percent in 2019.

99.5% overall pass rate – A* to E, slightly lower than 99.7 percent in 2020.

88.5% received a C or higher, up from 88 percent in 2020 and the highest rate since at least 2000.

In private schools, 70.1% had grades A or A* – compared to 42 per cent in state-run academies.

There is a 28.1% percentage point gap on A and A* between entries from private schools and academies, compared to 24.6 in 2020 and 20.3 in 2019.

46.9% Proportion of entries by girls who scored A or higher. This is 4.8 per cent higher than that of boys (42.1 per cent). Last year, girls led boys by 3.2 percentage points (39.9 percent girls, 36.7 percent boys).

A 3.6% increase in entrants to Mathematics, which was taken by 97,690 from the previous year – making it the most popular subject this year.

With more than 1,000 entrants at 35,268, geography saw the biggest percentage jump among candidates of any discipline, increasing by 16.8 per cent from 30,203 to 35,268.

435,430 people were accepted onto university courses from the UK and overseas, a 5 per cent increase on the previous year.

Of UK applicants, 388,230 have been accepted, an 8 per cent increase on the previous year.

A 50% drop in EU students taking the course – 9,820 compared to around 22,000 last year.

8% increase in students accepted to Nursing courses from last year to 26,730.

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