Train drivers have been offered a £5,000 pay rise if they agree to end their bitter dispute and the strikes that have roiled Britain’s railways

  • Rail Distribution Group has said that it will provide more reliable services for passengers
  • This will be in lieu of the increment of the previous date
  • Drivers to call off strike and work Sunday shift

Train drivers were last night offered an average wage increase of around £5,000 to end their bitter dispute.

Rail Delivery Group (RDG) said it is offering a ‘historic framework proposal’ that will provide more reliable services for passengers in return for a previous pay rise of four per cent for 2022, followed by 4 per cent this year will increase.

In return, the drivers would have to call off their strike and commit to working the Sunday shift in their contracts. The RDG said the proposal by drivers’ union Aslef would increase the salary of an experienced driver from an average of £60,000 to around £65,000.

The proposal would also guarantee that there would be no mandatory redundancies at least till the end of March next year.

Pictured: Drivers from the Asleaf union strike outside Ramsgate station in Kent (file photo)

RDG chairman Steve Montgomery said: ‘This is a fair and affordable offer in challenging times, providing a significant increase in train drivers’ pay while bringing in common sense and long-awaited reforms that will enhance reliability for passengers.

‘With taxpayers still funding up to an extra £175 million a month to make up for the post-Covid revenue shortfall, these changes are also vital for us to fund the pay rise our people deserve. Instead of taking yet more damaging strike action and rolling back changes that would improve services, we urge Asleaf to work with us to end the dispute between our people, our passengers and the future of UK railways ‘

A spokesman for Asleaf said last night the union had not yet received the proposal but it would be given ‘due consideration’ ahead of a scheduled meeting with Transport Secretary Mark Harper on Monday.

IMAGE: A train during a strike by train drivers of the SLEAF union (file photo).  The rail distribution group said it is offering a ¿landmark framework proposal¿ that will provide more reliable services for commuters in exchange for a 4 per cent backdated pay rise for 2022, followed by another 4 per cent this year. There will be more growth.

IMAGE: A train during a strike by train drivers of the SLEAF union (file photo). Rail Delivery Group said it is offering a ‘historic framework proposal’ that will deliver more reliable services for commuters in return for a previous pay rise of four per cent for 2022, followed by a 4 per cent increase this year.

However, an Aslef source said the decision to release details of the proposal to the media before discussing it with the union suggested the employers were ‘not serious’ about ending the dispute.

And earlier this week Aslef chief Mick Whelan said train drivers could continue to strike in solidarity with the RMT even if they were offered a better pay deal. He said the threat to the rail industry was ‘existential’, adding: ‘We may be forced out for safety reasons.’

Elsewhere, RMT union baron Mick Lynch yesterday vowed to ‘fight in the streets’ to stop new anti-strike laws – as the Treasury warned it could fund no more than 3.5 per cent wage hikes this year .

The union again started a 48-hour strike yesterday. Mr Lynch said members were prepared to fight Rishi Sunak’s plans for new laws that would force them to provide minimum services during strikes.

Mick Lynch vowed yesterday to take to the streets to block new anti-strike laws as the Treasury warned it could fund no more than 3.5 per cent wage increases this year.

Mick Lynch yesterday vowed to ‘fight in the streets’ to stop new anti-strike laws – as the Treasury warned it could fund no more than a 3.5 per cent wage increase this year.

The prime minister’s new plan would allow employers to sue unions and fire employees who refuse to provide essential services.

Mr Lynch said: ‘Once it is drafted, we will fight it out in Parliament. If we can do massive demonstrations, we will fight it on the streets.

‘We need the entire trade union movement and all the democracies in this country to stand up against this suppression of human rights.’

Mr Sunak said: ‘We want to have an adult, honest conversation with all union leaders about what is responsible, what is fair and what is affordable for our country.’

Ambulance workers of the United Union have announced yet another strike in a dispute over wages and staff.

Image: Train in the countryside (file photo).  Rail Delivery Group said the proposal for drivers' union Asleaf would increase the salary of an experienced driver from an average of £60,000 to around £65,000.

Image: Train in the countryside (file photo). Rail Delivery Group said the offer from drivers’ union Asleaf would see an experienced driver’s salary increase from an average of £60,000 to around £65,000.

Unite said its members would walk out on 23 January but would work with local trusts to ensure ‘live and limb’ cover for the most severe calls.

Saffron Cowdery, representing the NHS trusts, said: ‘Another strike would put further pressure on already strained NHS services.

‘The trusts fear more attacks will make an extremely challenging situation worse.

‘To avoid another strike, there should be serious talks between the government and the unions, especially on wages.’

Advertisement

#Train #drivers #offered #pay #rise #agree #bitter #dispute #strike

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *